“I’m 13 and I shoot at Helston Gun Club. I love the fact that it’s all done by sound, you don’t have to look at the target to shoot. You find the sound and you shoot. Whenever I’ve told people at school about it they’ve all said ‘Ah that’s amazing, how can you do that with your ears?’ My friends call me Top Gun.”  Haydn, Blind Shooting, Helston Rifle & Pistol Club, Cornwall 

“I’m 13 and I shoot at Helston Gun Club. I love the fact that it’s all done by sound, you don’t have to look at the target to shoot. You find the sound and you shoot. Whenever I’ve told people at school about it they’ve all said ‘Ah that’s amazing, how can you do that with your ears?’ My friends call me Top Gun.”

Haydn, Blind Shooting, Helston Rifle & Pistol Club, Cornwall 

 Steve, St Austell Shooting Club, Cornwall 20 November 2013  “I’m 59 years old, Cornish of course, and I lost my sight when I was 21. I joined the gun club 15 years ago and fell in love with it. It’s good company and run by good people, and something I never dreamed of doing until they came up with this audio shooting. Crazy really, isn’t it? I’ve done lots of things I would never have done if I could see.” 

Steve, St Austell Shooting Club, Cornwall 20 November 2013

“I’m 59 years old, Cornish of course, and I lost my sight when I was 21. I joined the gun club 15 years ago and fell in love with it. It’s good company and run by good people, and something I never dreamed of doing until they came up with this audio shooting. Crazy really, isn’t it? I’ve done lots of things I would never have done if I could see.” 

 Reuben & Joan, Blind Dancing Club, Townshend, Cornwall 27 November 2013  “I’d never danced like this in my life. I enjoy dancing for the company. I like a lot of couple dancing and line dancing. I love that. I also do sequence dance and a bit of ball room dancing I suppose. My favourite is the sweetheart waltz. if I’ve got my hand on a woman I can go anywhere. I can dance quite freely and quite easily, and feel more safe.”  Reuben    “I enjoy dancing because of the company like Reuben. And I enjoy the music. My favourite dance is the waltz, yes I like that one. And the Calypso. In our position we enjoy it because we love the music, the people are nice... and we like getting dressed up, looking nice.”  Joan  

Reuben & Joan, Blind Dancing Club, Townshend, Cornwall 27 November 2013

“I’d never danced like this in my life. I enjoy dancing for the company. I like a lot of couple dancing and line dancing. I love that. I also do sequence dance and a bit of ball room dancing I suppose. My favourite is the sweetheart waltz. if I’ve got my hand on a woman I can go anywhere. I can dance quite freely and quite easily, and feel more safe.” Reuben

“I enjoy dancing because of the company like Reuben. And I enjoy the music. My favourite dance is the waltz, yes I like that one. And the Calypso. In our position we enjoy it because we love the music, the people are nice... and we like getting dressed up, looking nice.” Joan 

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 Joan, Visually Impaired Bowls Club, Gweek, Cornwall 26 November 2013  “When you suffer from sight loss sometimes it can be quite isolating, particularly when you live in a village area where there are not many people with a similar problem. I’ve had quite a long time to adapt, and now have a family and two children. It’s no good having children if you can’t do house work: can’t cook, can’t clean, and can’t wash. So I lead as normal a life as possible. It’s about making new friends and not sitting at home thinking you’ve got more problems than anyone else. Once you get out there are ways and means.” 

Joan, Visually Impaired Bowls Club, Gweek, Cornwall 26 November 2013

“When you suffer from sight loss sometimes it can be quite isolating, particularly when you live in a village area where there are not many people with a similar problem. I’ve had quite a long time to adapt, and now have a family and two children. It’s no good having children if you can’t do house work: can’t cook, can’t clean, and can’t wash. So I lead as normal a life as possible. It’s about making new friends and not sitting at home thinking you’ve got more problems than anyone else. Once you get out there are ways and means.” 

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 Reuben, Visually Impaired Bowl Club, Gweek, Cornwall 26 November 2013  “In Cornwall, and being visually impaired, there is a lot of help around. If you ask, they do help you. The CBA in Truro are great people, they taught me to use a computer, which set me on a road really to keep me happy for 10 years now that I’ve been blind. I started writing when I began to lose my sight, and wrote most of my books blind. There are very sociable people here. They look after you well and there’s nothing they don’t do for you. They make sure you get on the bus, make sure you get a game of bowls, and make sure you have a good meal. They really are good, there’s no doubt about that.” 

Reuben, Visually Impaired Bowl Club, Gweek, Cornwall 26 November 2013

“In Cornwall, and being visually impaired, there is a lot of help around. If you ask, they do help you. The CBA in Truro are great people, they taught me to use a computer, which set me on a road really to keep me happy for 10 years now that I’ve been blind. I started writing when I began to lose my sight, and wrote most of my books blind. There are very sociable people here. They look after you well and there’s nothing they don’t do for you. They make sure you get on the bus, make sure you get a game of bowls, and make sure you have a good meal. They really are good, there’s no doubt about that.” 

 “I had sight until I was about 32, and then I lost it. The gardening is great, it’s hands on and I get to meet people. At the moment we’re planting cuttings of herbs, and I am interested in herbs. There are so many services that have been cut by the council; these clubs make a lot of difference. They make me go out and mix with other visually impaired people which is really important. I like meeting people and coming here, and I do also learn things. At Christmas we do a garland, which is lovely because you can hang it up on the door. Andrew [tutor] showed us the onion sets we planted, and they’ve certainly grown. It would be good if we could see the real thing, this time they had leaves on. It’s very important really to get out and see a bit of nature as it should be, you know?”  Sylvia, Blind Gardening Club, Camborne, Cornwall 

“I had sight until I was about 32, and then I lost it. The gardening is great, it’s hands on and I get to meet people. At the moment we’re planting cuttings of herbs, and I am interested in herbs. There are so many services that have been cut by the council; these clubs make a lot of difference. They make me go out and mix with other visually impaired people which is really important. I like meeting people and coming here, and I do also learn things. At Christmas we do a garland, which is lovely because you can hang it up on the door. Andrew [tutor] showed us the onion sets we planted, and they’ve certainly grown. It would be good if we could see the real thing, this time they had leaves on. It’s very important really to get out and see a bit of nature as it should be, you know?”

Sylvia, Blind Gardening Club, Camborne, Cornwall 

 “Being totally blind and living alone, I have very little contact with people. I do have some contact with the outside world via my daughters and a visiting helper but other than that my life can be very lonely. I look forward to my weekly visit to the Gweek Visually Impaired Club with a feeling you can’t begin to imagine. To hear the sound of friendly voices I have heard over the years which radiate warmth to carry me over the next six days till we meet again. To converse, laugh and catch up on all the news. To compete at carpet bowls and sometimes win is a wonderful sense of achievement. We occasionally have entertainment from individuals and groups of singers in the afternoon, and always have a hot meal at the club. Tuesdays are definitely my day of the week. It is also a busy and tiring day for those lovely volunteers without whom we would be spending another dreary lonely day at home.”  Mitch Mitchell, Visually Impaired Bowls Club, Gweek, Cornwall 

“Being totally blind and living alone, I have very little contact with people. I do have some contact with the outside world via my daughters and a visiting helper but other than that my life can be very lonely. I look forward to my weekly visit to the Gweek Visually Impaired Club with a feeling you can’t begin to imagine. To hear the sound of friendly voices I have heard over the years which radiate warmth to carry me over the next six days till we meet again. To converse, laugh and catch up on all the news. To compete at carpet bowls and sometimes win is a wonderful sense of achievement. We occasionally have entertainment from individuals and groups of singers in the afternoon, and always have a hot meal at the club. Tuesdays are definitely my day of the week. It is also a busy and tiring day for those lovely volunteers without whom we would be spending another dreary lonely day at home.”

Mitch Mitchell, Visually Impaired Bowls Club, Gweek, Cornwall 

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 “I lost my sight in 1998 after septicemia and a stroke which left me black blind. I’ve been shooting since 1999 in St Austell, gave up for a year when my daughter was born, and then shortly after that moved down here to the Helston club. Twice now I’ve been picked to shoot for England, I think I’m averaging a score now about 99/100, that sounds really big headed! I’d be surprised if we even get funding in 10 years to be honest, it’s getting cut back and back. Charities rely on people giving money, so if the local council stops giving money then that’s money we’ll have to find from Joe Public’s pocket, which in this day and age is getting more difficult. The main thing for the gun club, like all the clubs, is it’s a social thing for the visually impaired. Being blind is quite isolating, there’s a lot of people here that, though they may have friends and family, it’s not the same as coming here, having a laugh, taking the mick out of eachother, with people that can understand what you’re going through. The clubs are important, and of course I love my shooting!“  Joe, Blind Shooting, Helston Rifle & Pistol Club, Cornwall 

“I lost my sight in 1998 after septicemia and a stroke which left me black blind. I’ve been shooting since 1999 in St Austell, gave up for a year when my daughter was born, and then shortly after that moved down here to the Helston club. Twice now I’ve been picked to shoot for England, I think I’m averaging a score now about 99/100, that sounds really big headed! I’d be surprised if we even get funding in 10 years to be honest, it’s getting cut back and back. Charities rely on people giving money, so if the local council stops giving money then that’s money we’ll have to find from Joe Public’s pocket, which in this day and age is getting more difficult. The main thing for the gun club, like all the clubs, is it’s a social thing for the visually impaired. Being blind is quite isolating, there’s a lot of people here that, though they may have friends and family, it’s not the same as coming here, having a laugh, taking the mick out of eachother, with people that can understand what you’re going through. The clubs are important, and of course I love my shooting!“

Joe, Blind Shooting, Helston Rifle & Pistol Club, Cornwall 

 “I’m 13 and I shoot at Helston Gun Club. I love the fact that it’s all done by sound, you don’t have to look at the target to shoot. You find the sound and you shoot. Whenever I’ve told people at school about it they’ve all said ‘Ah that’s amazing, how can you do that with your ears?’ My friends call me Top Gun.”  Haydn, Blind Shooting, Helston Rifle & Pistol Club, Cornwall 
 Steve, St Austell Shooting Club, Cornwall 20 November 2013  “I’m 59 years old, Cornish of course, and I lost my sight when I was 21. I joined the gun club 15 years ago and fell in love with it. It’s good company and run by good people, and something I never dreamed of doing until they came up with this audio shooting. Crazy really, isn’t it? I’ve done lots of things I would never have done if I could see.” 
 Reuben & Joan, Blind Dancing Club, Townshend, Cornwall 27 November 2013  “I’d never danced like this in my life. I enjoy dancing for the company. I like a lot of couple dancing and line dancing. I love that. I also do sequence dance and a bit of ball room dancing I suppose. My favourite is the sweetheart waltz. if I’ve got my hand on a woman I can go anywhere. I can dance quite freely and quite easily, and feel more safe.”  Reuben    “I enjoy dancing because of the company like Reuben. And I enjoy the music. My favourite dance is the waltz, yes I like that one. And the Calypso. In our position we enjoy it because we love the music, the people are nice... and we like getting dressed up, looking nice.”  Joan  
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 Joan, Visually Impaired Bowls Club, Gweek, Cornwall 26 November 2013  “When you suffer from sight loss sometimes it can be quite isolating, particularly when you live in a village area where there are not many people with a similar problem. I’ve had quite a long time to adapt, and now have a family and two children. It’s no good having children if you can’t do house work: can’t cook, can’t clean, and can’t wash. So I lead as normal a life as possible. It’s about making new friends and not sitting at home thinking you’ve got more problems than anyone else. Once you get out there are ways and means.” 
TP_MINICLICK-6 MidRes.jpg
 Reuben, Visually Impaired Bowl Club, Gweek, Cornwall 26 November 2013  “In Cornwall, and being visually impaired, there is a lot of help around. If you ask, they do help you. The CBA in Truro are great people, they taught me to use a computer, which set me on a road really to keep me happy for 10 years now that I’ve been blind. I started writing when I began to lose my sight, and wrote most of my books blind. There are very sociable people here. They look after you well and there’s nothing they don’t do for you. They make sure you get on the bus, make sure you get a game of bowls, and make sure you have a good meal. They really are good, there’s no doubt about that.” 
 “I had sight until I was about 32, and then I lost it. The gardening is great, it’s hands on and I get to meet people. At the moment we’re planting cuttings of herbs, and I am interested in herbs. There are so many services that have been cut by the council; these clubs make a lot of difference. They make me go out and mix with other visually impaired people which is really important. I like meeting people and coming here, and I do also learn things. At Christmas we do a garland, which is lovely because you can hang it up on the door. Andrew [tutor] showed us the onion sets we planted, and they’ve certainly grown. It would be good if we could see the real thing, this time they had leaves on. It’s very important really to get out and see a bit of nature as it should be, you know?”  Sylvia, Blind Gardening Club, Camborne, Cornwall 
 “Being totally blind and living alone, I have very little contact with people. I do have some contact with the outside world via my daughters and a visiting helper but other than that my life can be very lonely. I look forward to my weekly visit to the Gweek Visually Impaired Club with a feeling you can’t begin to imagine. To hear the sound of friendly voices I have heard over the years which radiate warmth to carry me over the next six days till we meet again. To converse, laugh and catch up on all the news. To compete at carpet bowls and sometimes win is a wonderful sense of achievement. We occasionally have entertainment from individuals and groups of singers in the afternoon, and always have a hot meal at the club. Tuesdays are definitely my day of the week. It is also a busy and tiring day for those lovely volunteers without whom we would be spending another dreary lonely day at home.”  Mitch Mitchell, Visually Impaired Bowls Club, Gweek, Cornwall 
TP_MINICLICK-2 MidRes.jpg
TomPullen_BICS_5.jpg
PA2014_TP_CAT14_02.JPG
 “I lost my sight in 1998 after septicemia and a stroke which left me black blind. I’ve been shooting since 1999 in St Austell, gave up for a year when my daughter was born, and then shortly after that moved down here to the Helston club. Twice now I’ve been picked to shoot for England, I think I’m averaging a score now about 99/100, that sounds really big headed! I’d be surprised if we even get funding in 10 years to be honest, it’s getting cut back and back. Charities rely on people giving money, so if the local council stops giving money then that’s money we’ll have to find from Joe Public’s pocket, which in this day and age is getting more difficult. The main thing for the gun club, like all the clubs, is it’s a social thing for the visually impaired. Being blind is quite isolating, there’s a lot of people here that, though they may have friends and family, it’s not the same as coming here, having a laugh, taking the mick out of eachother, with people that can understand what you’re going through. The clubs are important, and of course I love my shooting!“  Joe, Blind Shooting, Helston Rifle & Pistol Club, Cornwall 

“I’m 13 and I shoot at Helston Gun Club. I love the fact that it’s all done by sound, you don’t have to look at the target to shoot. You find the sound and you shoot. Whenever I’ve told people at school about it they’ve all said ‘Ah that’s amazing, how can you do that with your ears?’ My friends call me Top Gun.”

Haydn, Blind Shooting, Helston Rifle & Pistol Club, Cornwall 

Steve, St Austell Shooting Club, Cornwall 20 November 2013

“I’m 59 years old, Cornish of course, and I lost my sight when I was 21. I joined the gun club 15 years ago and fell in love with it. It’s good company and run by good people, and something I never dreamed of doing until they came up with this audio shooting. Crazy really, isn’t it? I’ve done lots of things I would never have done if I could see.” 

Reuben & Joan, Blind Dancing Club, Townshend, Cornwall 27 November 2013

“I’d never danced like this in my life. I enjoy dancing for the company. I like a lot of couple dancing and line dancing. I love that. I also do sequence dance and a bit of ball room dancing I suppose. My favourite is the sweetheart waltz. if I’ve got my hand on a woman I can go anywhere. I can dance quite freely and quite easily, and feel more safe.” Reuben

“I enjoy dancing because of the company like Reuben. And I enjoy the music. My favourite dance is the waltz, yes I like that one. And the Calypso. In our position we enjoy it because we love the music, the people are nice... and we like getting dressed up, looking nice.” Joan 

Joan, Visually Impaired Bowls Club, Gweek, Cornwall 26 November 2013

“When you suffer from sight loss sometimes it can be quite isolating, particularly when you live in a village area where there are not many people with a similar problem. I’ve had quite a long time to adapt, and now have a family and two children. It’s no good having children if you can’t do house work: can’t cook, can’t clean, and can’t wash. So I lead as normal a life as possible. It’s about making new friends and not sitting at home thinking you’ve got more problems than anyone else. Once you get out there are ways and means.” 

Reuben, Visually Impaired Bowl Club, Gweek, Cornwall 26 November 2013

“In Cornwall, and being visually impaired, there is a lot of help around. If you ask, they do help you. The CBA in Truro are great people, they taught me to use a computer, which set me on a road really to keep me happy for 10 years now that I’ve been blind. I started writing when I began to lose my sight, and wrote most of my books blind. There are very sociable people here. They look after you well and there’s nothing they don’t do for you. They make sure you get on the bus, make sure you get a game of bowls, and make sure you have a good meal. They really are good, there’s no doubt about that.” 

“I had sight until I was about 32, and then I lost it. The gardening is great, it’s hands on and I get to meet people. At the moment we’re planting cuttings of herbs, and I am interested in herbs. There are so many services that have been cut by the council; these clubs make a lot of difference. They make me go out and mix with other visually impaired people which is really important. I like meeting people and coming here, and I do also learn things. At Christmas we do a garland, which is lovely because you can hang it up on the door. Andrew [tutor] showed us the onion sets we planted, and they’ve certainly grown. It would be good if we could see the real thing, this time they had leaves on. It’s very important really to get out and see a bit of nature as it should be, you know?”

Sylvia, Blind Gardening Club, Camborne, Cornwall 

“Being totally blind and living alone, I have very little contact with people. I do have some contact with the outside world via my daughters and a visiting helper but other than that my life can be very lonely. I look forward to my weekly visit to the Gweek Visually Impaired Club with a feeling you can’t begin to imagine. To hear the sound of friendly voices I have heard over the years which radiate warmth to carry me over the next six days till we meet again. To converse, laugh and catch up on all the news. To compete at carpet bowls and sometimes win is a wonderful sense of achievement. We occasionally have entertainment from individuals and groups of singers in the afternoon, and always have a hot meal at the club. Tuesdays are definitely my day of the week. It is also a busy and tiring day for those lovely volunteers without whom we would be spending another dreary lonely day at home.”

Mitch Mitchell, Visually Impaired Bowls Club, Gweek, Cornwall 

“I lost my sight in 1998 after septicemia and a stroke which left me black blind. I’ve been shooting since 1999 in St Austell, gave up for a year when my daughter was born, and then shortly after that moved down here to the Helston club. Twice now I’ve been picked to shoot for England, I think I’m averaging a score now about 99/100, that sounds really big headed! I’d be surprised if we even get funding in 10 years to be honest, it’s getting cut back and back. Charities rely on people giving money, so if the local council stops giving money then that’s money we’ll have to find from Joe Public’s pocket, which in this day and age is getting more difficult. The main thing for the gun club, like all the clubs, is it’s a social thing for the visually impaired. Being blind is quite isolating, there’s a lot of people here that, though they may have friends and family, it’s not the same as coming here, having a laugh, taking the mick out of eachother, with people that can understand what you’re going through. The clubs are important, and of course I love my shooting!“

Joe, Blind Shooting, Helston Rifle & Pistol Club, Cornwall 

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